Beg 'n Bark pet sitting
"We treat you like family"
Dog Food Nutrition By Mary E Ryan, Pet Nutrition Specialist Kibble   (dry   dog   food)   is   the   major   component   of   a   canine   diet   and   widely   available   in   pet stores,   superstores   and   grocery   chains.   Kibble   is   suggested   because   it   is   formulated   to   be   a complete   balanced   diet   for   a   dog’s   life   stage   and   better   for   canine   teeth.   They   come   in   a wide   range   of   choices   based   on   age,   breed,   lifestyle   and   flavor   preferences.   It   is   highly recommended   to   choose   the   food   to   match   your   individual   dog’s   needs,   age,   weight   and lifestyle (i.e. puppy, senior, weight management, active). The highest end foods are tagged with keywords “Holistic”, “All Natural”, and Superfoods”. Holistic,   meaning   a   synergy   of   the   healthiest   foods   currently   known   to   nutritionists   to   work together, to support the action of one another. All   Natural,   meaning   only   naturally   derived   ingredients,   nutrients   and   vitamins,   to   ensure   a formula free of chemical preservatives, artificial coloring and flavorings. Superfoods,   being   so   named   in   recent   years   for   being   found   in   studies   of   both   humans   and animals to be far superior in fighting aging, cancer and various diseases. These   premium   dog   foods   are   usually   rich   in   the   essential   fatty   acids,   Omega   3   and   6   for shiny   coat   and   healthy   skin.   Also   included   are   antioxidant   rich   dark   fruits   and   vegetables and   beta   carotene,   known   for   cancer   prevention   abilities,   coming   from   spinach,   blueberries, cranberries,   pomegranate,   pumpkin,   carrots,   avocado,   tomato   pomace.   Amino   acids   come from   lean   proteins,   usually   of   a   meat   which   is   considered   less   allergenic,   such   as   fish,   lamb or   venison.   Healthy   fats   used   are   sunflower,   safflower,   canola,   flaxseed   or   fish   oils.   Easily digestible carbohydrates are taken from rice, oatmeal, barley or potato. Avoided   are   low   cost   fillers,   whole   grain   corn,   wheat   or   soy,   and   unnamed   animal   fats,   meat by-products and artificial colors and chemically derived preservatives. The   dry   kibble   may   be   flavored   by   adding   chicken   broth   or   vegetable   soup,   instead   of   adding canned   food.   And   adding   in   additional   fresh   fruits   and   vegetables   are   also   recommended. Carrot sticks, apples and sweet potatoes make wonderful between meal snacks!
Beg’N Bark Brenda Janner 114 Bergen Ave. Princeton, New Jersey 08540 609.285.3562 email: Brenda@begnbark.com Licensed, Bonded & Insured Certified in Pet CPR & Pet First Aid Over 10 Years experience Veterinarian Recommended Supports Princeton SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals Member of Professional Pet Sitters International Beg ‘n Bark offers dog walking and pet sitting services in:  Princeton, Montgomery, Lawrenceville, Rocky Hill, Kingston, Skillman, Princeton Township, Princeton Junction,  Lambertville, Hopewell Township, Hopewell Boro and Ewing Copyright © 2015 Beg’n Bark, Inc / Brenda@begnbark.com.
Beg ‘Bark Brenda Janner 114 Bergen Ave. Princeton, New Jersey 08540 609.285.3562 email: Brenda@begnbark.com Licensed, Bonded & Insured Certified in Pet CPR & Pet First Aid Over 10 Years experience Veterinarian Recommended Supports Princeton SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals Member of Professional Pet Sitters International Beg ‘n Bark offers dog walking and pet sitting services in:  Princeton, Montgomery, Lawrenceville, Rocky Hill, Griggstown, Kingston, Skillman, Princeton Township, Princeton Junction,  Lambertville, Hopewell, Ewing,  and Bell Meade. Copyright © 2015 Beg’n Bark, Inc /  Brenda@begnbark.com.
Beg 'n Bark pet sitting
"We treat you like family"
Dog Food Nutrition By Mary E Ryan, Pet Nutrition Specialist Kibble   (dry   dog   food)   is   the   major   component   of   a   canine diet    and    widely    available    in    pet    stores,    superstores    and grocery   chains.   Kibble   is   suggested   because   it   is   formulated to   be   a   complete   balanced   diet   for   a   dog’s   life   stage   and better    for    canine    teeth.    They    come    in    a    wide    range    of choices   based   on   age,   breed,   lifestyle   and   flavor   preferences. It   is   highly   recommended   to   choose   the   food   to   match   your individual   dog’s   needs,   age,   weight   and   lifestyle   (i.e.   puppy, senior, weight management, active). The highest end foods are tagged with keywords “Holistic”, “All Natural”, and Superfoods”. Holistic,   meaning   a   synergy   of   the   healthiest   foods   currently known    to    nutritionists    to    work    together,    to    support    the action of one another. All    Natural,    meaning    only    naturally    derived    ingredients, nutrients   and   vitamins,   to   ensure   a   formula   free   of   chemical preservatives, artificial coloring and flavorings. Superfoods,   being   so   named   in   recent   years   for   being   found in   studies   of   both   humans   and   animals   to   be   far   superior   in fighting aging, cancer and various diseases. These   premium   dog   foods   are   usually   rich   in   the   essential fatty   acids,   Omega   3   and   6   for   shiny   coat   and   healthy   skin. Also     included     are     antioxidant     rich     dark     fruits     and vegetables   and   beta   carotene,   known   for   cancer   prevention abilities,    coming    from    spinach,    blueberries,    cranberries, pomegranate,   pumpkin,   carrots,   avocado,   tomato   pomace. Amino   acids   come   from   lean   proteins,   usually   of   a   meat which   is   considered   less   allergenic,   such   as   fish,   lamb   or venison.   Healthy   fats   used   are   sunflower,   safflower,   canola, flaxseed    or    fish    oils.    Easily    digestible    carbohydrates    are taken from rice, oatmeal, barley or potato. Avoided   are   low   cost   fillers,   whole   grain   corn,   wheat   or   soy, and   unnamed   animal   fats,   meat   by-products   and   artificial colors and chemically derived preservatives. The   dry   kibble   may   be   flavored   by   adding   chicken   broth   or vegetable   soup,   instead   of   adding   canned   food.   And   adding in     additional     fresh     fruits     and     vegetables     are     also recommended.    Carrot    sticks,    apples    and    sweet    potatoes make wonderful between meal snacks!